Posts Tagged 'Docker'

March 6, 2015

The SLayer Standard Vol. 1 No. 7: the IBM InterConnect Edition

Last week, an estimated 21,000 IBMers, SLayers, customers and partners from around the world flooded Las Vegas, Nev. to attend the first-ever IBM InterConnect. This new conference combined three popular IBM conferences (Impact, Innovate and Pulse) into a single, premier cloud and mobile techno-topia.

What our engineers and developers did in Las Vegas after conference hours might have stayed in Las Vegas, but IBM’s InterConnect hits and announcements didn’t. Here’s a recap:

Speed to Market Wins the Cloud Computing Race
Everyone likes to go fast, and the new senior vice president for IBM Cloud, Robert LeBlanc, likes to go super-fast. “What I’m focusing on is speed,” LeBlanc says.

In this blink-and-the-market-changes world, time-to-market determines the winners and losers in cloud computing. Part of LeBlanc’s strategy is opening new SoftLayer datacenters. If you haven’t heard the news, SoftLayer will be launching Sydney and Montreal data centers in the next 30 days — with more coming soon. Stay tuned for more locations.

Read more on how LeBlanc plans to win the cloud business race.

Cloudy skies on the horizon—that’s a good thing!
Our CEO, Ginni Rometty, announced a $4 billion investment on cloud services (shared with the data analytics and mobile businesses). She’s hoping that the investment will spur $40 billion a year in revenue come 2018.

Signs of the investment could be seen as execs at InterConnect announced new hybrid services coming in 2015, including enterprise containers. [What’s a container? Read our blog post.]

In fact, hybrid was a big theme at InterConnect. “We are going to make all those clouds act like one,” says Angel Diaz, vice president of IBM cloud technologies. IBM cloud (powered by SoftLayer) will be a one-stop shop: a cloud superstore with a smorgasbord of aaS offerings.

It looks like it’ll be an exciting ride for IBM over the next couple of years. Make sure to keep up with the headlines for more announcements in the coming months.

-JRL

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March 4, 2015

Docker: Containerization for Software

Before modern-day shipping, packing and transporting different shaped boxes and other oddly shaped items from ships to trucks to warehouses was difficult, inefficient, and cumbersome. That was until the modern day shipping container was introduced to the industry. These containers could easily be stacked and organized onto a cargo ship then easily transferred to a truck where it would be sent on to its final destination. Solomon Hykes, Docker founder and CTO, likens the Docker to the modern-day shipping industry’s solution for shipping goods. Docker utilizes containerization for shipping software.

Docker, an open platform for distributed applications used by developers and system administrators, leverages standard Linux container technologies and some git-inspired image management technology. Users can create containers that have everything they need to run an application just like a virtual server but are much lighter to deploy and manage. Each container has all the binaries it needs including library and middleware, configuration, and activation process. The containers can be moved around [like containers on ships] and executed in any Docker-enabled server.

Container images are built and maintained using deltas, which can be used by several other images. Sharing reduces the overall size and allows for easy image storage in Docker registries [like containers on ships]. Any user with access to the registry can download the image and activate it on any server with a couple of commands. Some organizations have development teams that build the images, which are run by their operations teams.

Docker & SoftLayer

The lightweight containers can be used on both virtual servers and bare metal servers, making Docker a nice fit with a SoftLayer offering. You get all the flexibility of a re-imaged server without the downtime. You can create red-black deployments, and mix hourly and monthly servers, both virtual and bare metal.

While many people share images on the public Docker registry, security-minded organizations will want to create a private registry by leveraging SoftLayer object storage. You can create Docker images for a private registry that will store all its information with object storage. Registries are then easy to create and move to new hosts or between data centers.

Creating a Private Docker Registry on SoftLayer

Use the following information to create a private registry that stores data with SoftLayer object storage. [All the commands below were executed on an Ubuntu 14.04 virtual server on SoftLayer.]

Optional setup step: Change Docker backend storage AuFS

Docker has several options for an image storage backend. The default backend is DeviceMapper. The option was not very stable during the test, failing to start and export images. This step may not be necessary in your specific build depending on updates of the operating system or Docker itself. The solution was to move to Another Union File System (AuFS).
  1. Install the following package to enable AuFS:
    apt-get install linux-image-extra-3.13.0-36-generic
  2. Edit /etc/init/docker.conf, and add the following line or argument:
    DOCKER_OPTS="--storage-driver=aufs"
  3. Restart Docker, and check if the backend was changed:
    service docker restart
    docker info

The command should indicate AuFS is being used. The output should look similar to the following:
Containers: 2
Images: 29
Storage Driver: aufs
Root Dir: /var/lib/docker/aufs
Dirs: 33
Execution Driver: native-0.2
Kernel Version: 3.13.0-36-generic
WARNING: No swap limit support

Step 1: Create image repo

  1. Create the directory registry-os in a work directory.
  2. Create a file named Dockerfile in the registry-os directory. It should contain the following code:
    # start from a registry release known to work
    FROM registry:0.7.3
    # get the swift driver for the registry
    RUN pip install docker-registry-driver-swift==0.0.1
    # SoftLayer uses v1 auth and the sample config doesn't have an option 
    # for it so inject one
    RUN sed -i '91i\    swift_auth_version: _env:OS_AUTH_VERSION' /docker-registry/config/config_sample.yml
  3. Execute the following command from the directory that contains the registry-os directory to build the registry container:
    docker build -t registry-swift:0.7.3 registry-os

Step 2: Start it with your object storage credential

The credentials and container on the object storage must be provided in order to start the registry image. The standard Docker way of doing this is to pass the credentials as environment variables.
docker run -it -d -e SETTINGS_FLAVOR=swift -e 
OS_AUTH_URL='<a href="https://dal05.objectstorage.service.network
layer.com/auth/v1.0">https://dal05.objectstorage.service.network
layer.com/auth/v1.0</a>'     -e OS_AUTH_VERSION=1     -e
OS_USERNAME='<API-USER>'     -e 
OS_PASSWORD='<API_KEY>'     -e 
OS_CONTAINER='docker'     -e GUNICORN_WORKERS=8     -p 
127.0.0.1:5000:5000     registry-swift:0.7.3

This example assumes we are storing images in DAL05 on a container called docker. API_USER and API_KEY are the object storage credentials you can obtain from the portal.

Step 3: Push image

An image needs to be pushed to the registry to make sure everything works. The image push involves two steps: tagging an image and pushing it to the registry.
docker tag registry-swift:0.7.3 localhost:5000/registry-swift
 
docker push localhost:5000/registry-swift

You can ensure that it worked by inspecting the contents of the container in the object storage.

Step 4: Get image

The image can be downloaded once successfully pushed to object storage via the registry by issuing the following command:
docker pull localhost:5000/registry-swift
Images can be downloaded from other servers by replacing localhost with the IP address to the registry server.

Final Considerations

The Docker container can be pushed throughout your infrastructure once you have created your private registry. Failure of the machine that contains the registry can be quickly mitigated by restarting the image on another node. To restart the image, make sure it’s on more than one node in the registry allowing you to leverage the SoftLayer platform and the high durability of object storage.

If you haven’t explored Docker, visit their site, and review the use cases.

-Thomas

January 15, 2015

Hot in 2015: Trends and Predictions

As cloud technology moves into 2015, the pace of innovation in the cloud space continues to accelerate faster and faster. Being no stranger to innovation ourselves, we’ve got our collective finger on the pulse of what’s up and coming. Here are some trends we see on the horizon for cloud in 2015.

Hybrid cloud
As more and more workloads move to the cloud, many companies are looking for a way to leverage all of the value and economies of scale that the cloud provides while still being able to keep sensitive data secure. Hybrid cloud solutions, which can mean an environment that employs both private and public cloud services, on- and off-prem resources, or a service that combines both bare metal and virtual servers, will continue to grow in popularity. With 70 percent of CIOs planning to change their company’s sourcing and technology relationship within the next three years, Gartner notes that hybrid IT environments will dominate the space as they offer many of the benefits of legacy, old-world environments but still operate within the new-world as-a-service model.

Read more:
+IBM Hybrid Clouds

Bare metal
In 2015, the term bare metal will be officially mainstream. Early on, bare metal servers were seen as a necessity for only a few users, but now it has become the ideal solution for processor-intensive and disk I/O-intensive workloads like big data and analytics. We’ve been in the business of bare metal (formerly called dedicated servers) for 10 years now, and we’re happy to see the term become a standard part of the cloud dialogue. As cloud workloads get tougher and more complex in 2015, companies will continue to turn to bare metal for its raw performance.
Security
Security has been a hot topic in the news. In 2014, major retailers were hacked, certain celebrity photos were leaked, and issues surrounding government surveillance were in the spotlight. More than ever, these incidents have reminded everyone that the underlying architectures of the Internet are not secure, and without protections like firewalls, private networks, encryption, and other security features, private data isn’t truly private. In response to these concerns, tech companies will offer even higher levels of security in order to protect consumers’ and merchants’ sensitive data.

Read more:
+SoftLayer Cloud Security

Big data
Big data moves from hype and buzzword status to mainstream. The cloud industry has seen a change in the way big data is being put to work. It’s becoming more widely adopted by organizations of all types and sizes, in both the public and private sectors. One such organization is the Chicago Department of Public Health, which is using predictive analytics and data to experiment and improve food inspection and sanitation work. The city’s team has developed a machine-learning program to mine Twitter for tweets that use words related to food poisoning so that they can reply directly to posters, encouraging them to file a formal report. We’ll see much more of this kind of smart application of big data analytics to real-life problems in the year to come.

Read more:
+ In Chicago, Food Inspectors are Guided by Big Data

Docker
Docker is an open platform for developers and system administrators to build, ship, and run distributed applications. It enables apps to be quickly assembled from components and eliminates the friction between development, QA, and production environments. Streamlining workflow, the Docker software container allows developers to work on the exact same deployment stack that programmers use and contains all the dependencies within it. It can also be moved from bare metal to hybrid cloud environments—positioning it to be the next big thing on the cloud scene in 2015. IBM has already capitalized on Docker’s simplicity and portability by launching its IBM Containers service, part of Bluemix, last month. IBM Containers will help enterprises launch Docker containers directly onto the IBM Cloud via bare metal servers from SoftLayer.

Read more:
+Docker
+At DockerCon Amsterdam, an Under Fire Docker Makes a Raft of Announcements

Health care
The medical and health care industries will continue to adopt cloud in 2015 to store, compute, and analyze medical data as well as address public concerns about modernizing record-keeping and file-sharing practices. The challenge will be keeping patients’ sensitive medical data secure so that it can be shared among health care providers, but kept safely away from hackers.

Read more:
+Coriell Life Sciences

Data sovereignty
In order to comply with local data residency laws in certain regions, many global companies are finding it necessary to host data in country. As new data centers are established worldwide, it’s becoming easier to meet data sovereignty requirements. As a result of launching new data centers, cloud providers are increasing the size and power of their network—creating even lower latency connections—and creating an even more competitive cloud marketplace. As a result, smaller players might be left in the dust in 2015.

Read more:
+ Cloud Security Remains a Barrier for CIOs Across Europe

Enterprises
Last, but certainly not least, 2015 will see an aggressive move to the cloud by enterprise organizations. The cost- and timing-saving benefits of cloud adoption will continue to win over large companies.

Read more:
+IBM Enterprise Cloud System

Looking Ahead
Martin Schroeter, senior vice president and CFO, finance and enterprise at IBM has projected approximately $7 billion in total cloud-related sales in 2015, with $3 billion of that coming from new offerings and the rest from older products shifted to be delivered via the cloud.

SoftLayer will continue to match the pace of cloud adoption by providing innovative services and products, signing new customers, and launching new data centers worldwide. In Q1, our network of data centers will expand into Sydney, Australia, with more to come in 2015.

Read more:
+IBM’s Cloud-Based Future Rides on Newcomer Crosby
+InterConnect 2015

-Marc

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