Author Archive: Cheeku Samuel

November 2, 2015

The multitenant problem solver is here: VMWare 6 NSX on SoftLayer

We’re very excited to tell you about what’s coming down the pike here at SoftLayer: VMWare NSX 6! This is something that I’ve personally been anticipating for a while now, because it solves so many issues that are confronted on the multitenant platform. Here’s a diagram to explain exactly how it works:

As you can see, it uses the SoftLayer network, the underlay network and fabric, and uses NSX as the overlay network to create the SDN (Software Defined Network).

What is it?
VMware NSX is a virtual networking and security software product from VMware's vCloud Networking and Security (vCNS) and Nicira Network Virtualization Platform (NVP). NSX software-defined networking is part of VMware's software-defined data center concept, which offers cloud computing on VMware virtualization technologies. VMware's stated goal with NSX is to provision virtual networking environments without command line interfaces or other direct administrator intervention. Network virtualization abstracts network operations from the underlying hardware onto a distributed virtualization layer, much like server virtualization does for processing power and operating systems. VMware vCNS (formerly called vShield) virtualizes L4-L7 of the network. Nicira's NVP virtualizes the network fabric, L2 and L3. VMware says that NSX will expose logical firewalls, switches, routers, ports, and other networking elements to allow virtual networking among vendor-agnostic hypervisors, cloud management systems, and associated network hardware. It also will support external networking and security ecosystem services.

How does it work?
NSX network virtualization is an architecture that enables the full potential of a software-defined data center (SDDC), making it possible to create and run entire networks in parallel on top of existing network hardware. This results in faster deployment of workloads and greater agility in creating dynamic data centers.

This means you can create a flexible pool of network capacity that can be allocated, utilized, and repurposed on demand. You can decouple the network from underlying hardware and apply virtualization principles to network infrastructure. You’re able to deploy networks in software that are fully isolated from each other, as well as from other changes in the data center. NSX reproduces the entire networking environment in software, including L2, L3 and L4–L7 network services within each virtual network. NSX offers a distributed logical architecture for L2–L7 services, provisioning them programmatically when virtual machines are deployed and moving them with the virtual machines. With NSX, you already have the physical network resources you need for a next-generation data center.

What are some major features?
NSX brings an SDDC approach to network security. Its network virtualization capabilities enable the three key functions of micro-segmentation: isolation (no communication across unrelated networks), segmentation (controlled communication within a network), and security with advanced services (tight integration with leading third-party security solutions).

The key benefits of micro-segmentation include:

  1. Network security inside the data center: Fine-grained policies enable firewall controls and advanced security down to the level of the virtual NIC.
  2. Automated security for speed and agility in the data center: Security policies are automatically applied when a virtual machine spins up, moved when a virtual machine is migrated, and removed when a virtual machine is deprovisioned—eliminating the problem of stale firewall rules.
  3. Integration with the industry’s leading security products: NSX provides a platform for technology partners to bring their solutions to the SDDC. With NSX security tags, these solutions can adapt to constantly changing conditions in the data center for enhanced security.

As you can see, there are lots of great features and benefits for our customers.

You can find more great resources about NSX on SoftLayer here. Make sure to keep your eyes peeled for more great NSX news!

-Cheeku

August 28, 2014

Dude, how do I get into the cloud?

I know you may think that’s just a catchy title to get you to read my blog, but it’s not. I’ve actually had someone ask me that at a party. In fact, that’s the first thing anyone asks me when they find out I work for SoftLayer. The funny thing is, everyone is already in the cloud—they just don’t realize it! To make my point, I pick up their smart phone and tell them they already are in the cloud, and walk away. That, of course, sparks more conversation and the opportunity to educate my friends and family on the magic and mystery that is the cloud. But truthfully, it really is a very simple concept:

  • On demand
  • Compute
  • Consumption-based billing

That’s it. At its core. But if you want more detail, check out this document: NIST.

And, just to shed light on the backend of what the cloud is, well, it’s nothing but servers. I know, you were expecting something more exciting—maybe unicorns and fairy dust. But it’s not. We house the servers. We care for them daily. We store them and protect them. All from our data center.

What makes SoftLayer stand out from others in the cloud space is that we offer more than one-size-fits-all servers. We offer both public and private virtual servers like other cloud providers, but we also offer highly customizable and high performance bare metal, servers. And as with any good infrastructure, we offer all the ancillary services such as load balancing, firewalls, attached storage, DNS, etc…

There’s no magic involved here. We’ve simply taken your infrastructure and removed your capex and headache. You’re welcome.

So when you hear “The Cloud,” don’t be mystified, and don’t feel inadequate. Now you too can be the cloud genius at your next party. When they talk cloud, just say things like, “Oh yeah, it’s totally on demand computing that bills based on consumption.” Chicks dig that, trust me.

-Cheeku

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