CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds

October 23, 2014

I’ve written a lot of blog posts, some on our very own SoftLayer Development Network, but most of them have been posted right here on SoftLayer’s main blog. One of the most popular is a tutorial I wrote on being able to create a customized background depending on the user’s location. For example: A person visiting a website from the United States during the daytime may see a beautiful yellow background with an orange glow and a bright yellow sun just above the horizon, while a surfer from China may see the same website, but with a dark purple background with subtle white stars and a shimmering moon because it is night. The example I wrote customized the CSS to the time zone based on locale tailoring the site with a more personal touch.

The demand for sites to serve a more interactive experience has always been large in volume, but few websites actually deliver.

Luckily, our Web languages are evolving all of the time, and since I’ve written the “What time is it for you?” blog on our SLDN, more advancements have been made to the background functionality and browser compatibility. This means MORE browsers support these new features, and it’s compliant across the board!

Let’s start off with our usual HTML document (with an addition of an empty div for now, this is where we’re going to master our background techniques).

<html>
<head>
    <title>CSS3 Tips and Tricks – Mastering Multiple Backgrounds</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div class=”slBackgrounds”></div>
</body>
</html>

With CSS3, we can define multiple backgrounds in one declaration, like this:

background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;

By separating each background with just a comma, we’re able to declare many backgrounds for one div. Let’s go ahead and add our multi-background CSS in the <head> of our document:

<style>
    .slBackgrounds {
        width: 300px;
        height: 300px;
        margin: 0 auto;
        background: url('earth.png') no-repeat top 30px center, url('star_bg.png') repeat-y center;
        transition:background-position 600s;
    }
 
    .slBackgrounds:hover {
        background-position: top 30px center, 0px 60000px;
    }
</style>

After adding the CSS styling, you should have something that looks similar to the following:

You’ll notice I added a transition property to the .slBackgrounds class, and I bet you’re wondering why? Everybody has their own learning technique that helps them absorb concepts better and faster than other methods. My learning method (and probably 75 percent of other developers) happens to be the challenge technique: When I learn something new, I think about something extremely fun and challenging that I would like to do with this newfound knowledge beyond just the base use. For instance, why learn how to use multiple backgrounds with CSS3 and just have a five-line blog when we can learn to use multiple backgrounds, AND create an awesome animation sequence that can jazz up the old and boring background system?

Not only does this jazz it up, but by using additions such as the transition and :hover properties, we’re able to open new doors to possibilities with interactivity.

If you haven’t guessed already, the .slBackgrounds:hover section covers what should happen to the .slBackgrounds div when the user hovers over it; in this case, there’s a background-position declaration. The ‘top 30px center’ applies to the first background image, and the ‘0px 60000px’ applies to the second (gotta love multiple backgrounds!).

Go ahead and hover over our images! You should see something like this:

Something pretty simple, but I bet you can already think of a hundred things you can do with the CSS3 multiple background ability, huh? The great news is that the cross-browser compatibility is awesome and supports all newer browsers and most reasonably older ones too! And to think . . . barely five or six years ago it took MUCH more innovative coding and workarounds to achieve results like this without just embedding a flash file or an animated gif!

We’d love to hear how YOU’RE using multiple backgrounds!

- Cassandra

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